Tag Archives: procedure

Responsibilities of Emergency Co-ordinator and Safety Marshals at events.

1 Sep

The Emergency Co-ordinator is the overall co-ordinator of all safety marshals.

They are responsible for:

  1. Obtaining and posting emergency signage and drawing up of a floor plan and route evacuation map for the event.
  2. Overseeing the development, communication, implementation, and maintenance, and implementing of the overall Emergency evacuation plan (EEP).
  3. Ensuring the dissemination of the plan via announcement, of the plan to the spectators, as well as the procedures. Checking up on safety personnel, and notifying all personnel of changes to the plan, or infringements.
  4. Maintaining up to date lists of emergency contact numbers, critical operations personnel, and any other personnel with assigned duties under this plan. Lists must be supplied in Appendix to the plan, of responsible people and contacts.
  5. In the event of a fire or other emergency, relaying applicable information to emergency personnel,  the JOC and Public Safety officials.
  6. Establishing, demarcation and safeguarding of designated evacuation sites, and landing zones for helicopters, and emergency vehicles, for evacuees.

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Combining Management Principles with Disaster Management Aspects

9 May

Stop wasting time by creating mountains of elaborate planning, do it right, or just don’t do it at all.

Far too many disaster management plans are drawn up daily just for the sake of having one, because it is somehow “required”. Even more are drawn up costing thousands and are never implemented. The reason for this is they could not interface, or connect with structures and systems existing. 

What is a Disaster Management Plan?

First off, what is a disaster? Here is a short definition; A disaster is classified as being either natural or man-made. That has impact on a developed population’s infrastructure, housing, farms, or livelihood that destroys most of it, and caused extensive loss of human life, or drastically changes the landscape, environment, or economy of a region…

Now we can ask, what is a disaster management plan then? In simple terms; a disaster management plan encompasses more than just disaster readiness and planning aspects, it is very specific. Both in terms of being;
·         Industry specific,
·         Event specific,
·         Country specific and even
·         Language specific
·         Format specific…
It has characteristics of the environment it dictates to.  It connects via an identified or perceived threat or risk that it will, could or should address, if it transpires, alternatively, its preventative and mitigating.

Whenever contemplating preparing for “disasters”; in any form, be it small or large, then the way to deal with planning is to look at the composition of emergency and disaster management entities, and services existing in your area, and having a look at their planning first. Then only decide whether your contemplated plan will fit, or even add value. Any plan needs to fit in with both any local government, provincial, and even national governments plans, as well as their organs/ departments of state, in order to add value, or to even matter, and moreover make sense – it needs to close a gap, not open one. Other NGO’s  and industry stakeholders, and watch dogs are also custodians, like the Civil Aviation Authority etc… Continue reading

A Standard Operating Procedure for Strategic, Security, Emergency, Disaster & Event Management Planning.

23 Apr

A Standard Operating Procedure for Strategic, Security, Emergency, Disaster & Event Management Planning..

I am Changing the Corporate Culture Come Hell or High Water!!!

1 Apr

The number one element of business survival in the very near future will be the ability to influence your own corporate culture.

This aspect some predict will become the life blood of all organisations in the near future others say it’s already becoming a critical indicator informing production and profit margins.

How farfetched an idea that corporate culture can make or break a company, really?

Maybe we should look at the bigger picture, and only then draw some distinctions that will inform us as to how close to home this will peg, if it is truly, or will become a reality beckoning.

Don’t compete with internal rivals, take the initiative with labour, lead them around by the nose, or they will you.  Make them irrelevant. Labour has a voice, but when this voice become a political one you are in for hard times. If you have internal rivalry from labour elements, then it’s time to take the bull by the horns, and shake some sense into him. When labour mobilizes and politicise issues, then it’s because they need leadership, and have take the intuitive from you, because of a lack of leadership. The signs and symptoms are really obvious; they will start threatening, then withholding service, and then demanding, intimidating and then open confrontation and even violence will ensue.

Easier said than done, or is it? Companies have long since engaged with employees in head to head engagements on wage for labour issues. Better working condition and other labour issues, to name but a few.  Since we have become unionised and labour rights inclined we have lost most of our grip on the employees, and have had to find alternative methods of getting the most out of our employees. This is not what this article is about, it’s about creating a sound, normative culture…that will serve both side well, labour and employer. But there needs to be a natural order, balance and respect in place before these action can take place.

This is a huge paradigm shift.

In order for this to happen we have to grip the organisation by the jugular; and create a new value curve. That will influence how we manage and influence corporate culture. We need to address a few points in order to be in a position to address corporate culture…

By examining the value curve we embrace;

  1. Reduce the factors that dictate the power balance between employer and employee;
    1. By looking at best practices
    2. Industry standard
    3. Mitigation of identified risk elements; strikes, layoffs, HIV aids, socio economic, political issues, and public transport etc internal and external influence, must be identified, prioritised, and address as best possible.
  2. Create the factors that will give us leverage and the initiative to deal with all aspects of labour.
    1. Enforce discipline as a matter of daily order and function – consistently and fairly
    2. Offer benefits no one else can equal
    3. Opportunities for growth
  3. Raise the standards and reward accordingly
    1. Incentives, overtime, bonuses, performance bonuses, time off etc
  4. Eliminate waist, and factors that contribute to friction
    1. Email and telephone abuse
    2. Late coming etc..
    3. None performers, slackers, bottom feeders
    4. Raise the bar – raise the pay grading
    5. Define what is a job well done
    6. What is expected and how will one be rewarded and appraised, on paper.

Creating a new value curve; emits new hope. People need hope to cope with the daily reality; they need to feel that they amount to something greater than them, and are part of its creation. The value curve creates focus on critical under currents that effect how culture in the company grows and flows, into production, and leadership.

Then no one can  ride management like a rodeo horse;

In order to break with tradition, you need to create focus; all employees must come face to face with their new reality, and start absorbing it and living it, one bump at a time. Don’t let anyone hypothesise and dramatize any aspect. You tell them how it is, will be, and has to be. No funny business. Then you surprise them and show them what can be done how to do it and how to get the results… face it people, seeing is believing.  Get them out of denial and onto solid ground, let them see their feet again, so that they know they can stand, on their own two feet, and walk, let alone run. What this implies is, let people solve their work station problems themselves; you have to give control here to get control at the higher tiers back – culture.  There is always a need to revise and review strategy – never get stuck in conformity. Even if we manage by statistic and statically everything is 100%, get down to the ground and gain the experience that inform the statistics to make sure it’s a true reflection…

It’s all about perception management; closing the gap between where we were, and where we want to be, takes effort. Labour is renowned for employing guerrilla tactics, and using their “wear them down strategies”, by stone-walling and delaying all forms of change and implantation, except as much.  These good initiatives, reasoning being people will lose their perceived power, as leaders and unions. Then all is lost they own us again… as i said; it’s all perception and denial…

In summary, take care of your “life blood”, your corporate culture, and play the political game, if not it might take care of you in unexpected and challenging ways…

Now – Read the book or Ebook; Read more in my new book Strategic Management, The Radical Revolutionary Strategic Management Matrix for Predators by Reinier Geel, now available at Trafford;http://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?Book=339320

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