Looking at the nuts and bolts of a typical CONTINGENCY READYNESS SOP

29 Jun

I am going to keep this short, and to the point;

The steps are simple; however we first need to understand, why, how and when we need to do things.

Starting with step one, that needs little explanation;

Step one; Name your SOP

And then abbreviate it – Every SOP has a short name.

We will name this one “CR1” and just show how to go through the basics of drawing up an SOP – Standard Operating Procedure.

This one is referred to as CR1 – the  “CR” is the abbreviation for Contingency Readiness, and the 1 (one) refers to the first document ever (CR 1.1 for instance, then will be an amended one, Cr2 will be a revised one etc).

Sop’s need to be numbered, as changes are made, and revisions to protocol, it needs to stay alive and current. This is the best way to track them.Image

Step two; Define the Scope and purpose of this SOP

Tell them briefly what this is for; This will be the standing instruction set for all role-players at this event.  That will be followed by all role players, for as long as the event is on, and to apply the standard instructions in the event of a threat or disaster.

a)    Definitions and application

Tell them how it will work; This SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) aim and purpose is to pre-empt – thus prevent possible disasters and emergencies, or to minimise their effect. By looking at possible attributes of disasters and sources of danger before hand, during and after events. Both per- during and post event.

Give them a short overview;

It will govern;

  • First responder’s actions and activity; In the event of a threat or disaster, is to classify it as; perceived, real, and mitigating.
  • The first person to see it, or respond to it must do the following; categorise it
    • Perceived;EG. People sitting on the roof of the stadium, hanging their feet over the edge – any actions inconsistent with the norm of crowd behaviour and adult conduct should be reported and investigated by the marshals appointed –
      • Fire marshal
      • Safety marshal
      • Crowd marshal etc – specific appointed people trained or specialist in this field, to know and indentify real threats and risk; and how to deal with them.
      • The test would be (Would a normal person or person behave like this is the test, under normal conditions?)
  • Real; I have a fire burning in a car park; it is actually happening now.
  • Mitigating – possible; things, people, and attributes that can cause problems, to put it plainly

b)        Its Application

This SOP will serve as a basic lead up to any standing contingency plan to kick in, if any, in the absence of such plans, or activity we will stay with the stipulations and guidelines of  CR1 until we hand over to the authorities, or leading agency.

 This will cover for all operational aspects specifically aimed at these aspects of events; safety and security, as well as emergency and disaster management.  

As defined by an emergency involving natural disasters, terrorists actions, hostage takers, political rivals, drunk and disorderly parties, or any criminal activities. As well as any activity not normal. We therefore follow the SOP until the emergency is over, or until we get assistance and can hand over.

c)      What’s the essence – the Interpretation

Due to the uncertainty of the situations that arise and the subsequent chaos that follow emergency and disasters,

(1) specific basic guidelines are set, as standards operating procedure to follow/ to perform, that require no training,

(2) The main aim is to unify efforts, and to get command and control of the situation, to get the satiation to be reported on, and communicated to the right leading agency, and to do it well – called a SITREP.

This aspect will be known as a Situational Report – or  a SITREP.

The first responder will be asked to give a SITREP when he or she reports an incident of concern. Then the reporter or first person reporting and on scene, must give structured feedback. Either intermitting – at short intervals – or as and when the facts become apparent.

In short it will look something like this; In the event of an emergency of life threatening importance, or magnitude, a code will be called over the radio – CODE RED

  • This will then be interpreted by all as radio silence –
  • then the reporter will proceed to dispatch the message as structured as possible
  • the JOC or VOC will then summarise and give initial response instructions

 

In the event of a disaster of life threatening importance, or magnitude, a code will be called over the radio – CODE 999

  • then there is no way, or time to summarize in detail what’s happening,
  • we need to move to the place or address with both caution and speed
  • or to the assembly point whichever the case

IMPORTANT ATTRIBUTES FOR EVENT MANGEMENT

Structures need to be in place and communicated before any SOP will have real value. Contingency planning and lead agency appointment is key to smooth operations.

All contingencies require plans, rapid response, and special procedures, and trained people and equipment, unique to the situation – firemen for fires, police for hostage takers, and medical staff for wounded people. Then they also need to ensure the safety and readiness of personnel, installations, and equipment, all specifics. Contingency planning gives us an edge in operations involving special needs, and then also combined applications. Only if we plan, will we pass the first few gates, towards the goal seamlessly. After that we need to make it up as we go along. It is how we start, that saves lives, not how we finish.

Contingency operations are often based on international standards and best practise,

Specialist deployed on short-notice, gives contingency operations the edge, many have to rely on second hand info and work their way through to the crowds to the scene before they can get to work. If we have structures and strategy in place this won’t happen. We need teams in place to escort specialist, agencies, and authorities onto the venue.. With quad bikes, or golf cars etc…

There also needs to be support for additional equipment or supplies. Most likely, such support will be limited.

Efforts to restore or maintain order is paramount, the potential or actual conflict is always just an argument away, one gesture away, one word…when people get afraid, panic ensues.

“COUNTER” initiatives or mitigation strategy

Having counter or risk reduction strategies in place – mitigates potential follow on or fall out. (More aggravation, death, or further and resulting casualties or disaster).

This implies; that we need to double our efforts in divergent fashion with certain situations when responding. We need to pre-empt certain scenarios and know that we need to respond in a certain fashion, to be effective…

NATURAL DISASTERS

Support during natural disasters, will mostly come from local government or the state run agencies

SPECIAL EVENT SUPPORT

Here we need to be self sufficient

What are your procedures – in the event of?

This is where a emergency and disaster management plan has to be in place, as well as a safety and security. Only here will the leading agencies be appointed, to lead in the event of – x, it will be fire department, y- will be police etc…Planning becomes indispensable, no planning, then a SOP is worth nothing. It needs a backup, a strategic event management plan, operational plan, and structure.

Quantify then qualify your plans, and then identify the resource and link them with your SOP’s

Quantify; how much do we think/ calculate we will need, then qualify – motivate why, to meet a criteria, or standard, or provision, and then identify what or who will be best suited to do this with.

  • Your plans must solve the following questions – identify what would be the most obvious threats to your event?
  • The decide how will you best deal with each aspect identified
  • Then decide who is in control of what, where, when, and how?
  • Then appoint specific people to take charge.
    • Who is responsible
    • and who will be accountable in certain situations?
  • What is the correct procedure? – establish a SOP
    • To develop any SOP –or procedure, thoroughly and accurately, we need to know what information must be gathered and from what sources?
    • Also check the legal requirements here?
  • What sources are considered authoritative –
    • Thus leading agencies or
      • POLICE, FIRE BRIGADE, EMERGANCY AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT…
    • otherwise informative
      • BOOKS< INTERNET< MANUALS< DOCUMENTS< TV< RADIO
    • or facilitating this procedure?
      • RED CROSS > MOUNTAIN RESQUE CLUB< NGO”S
  • If a procedure already existed for achieving the objective, what were its strengths and weaknesses in the past?

Then Identify;

  • What conditions exist that are favourable, and unfavourable;
    • Equipment, materials, specialists or specific technology, and infrastructure are important to the procedure that will be established to serve as a SOP. (We cannot design SOP’s outside of our means.)
    • as well as having informed, contacted, and established rapport lines with each role-play, and established  which role-plays and stakeholders are directly involved, and how they will communicate.
    • And then get it from them, how they see the fit with this SOP? (or not)
    • Consider culture and work ethic of your targeted group. If you write for security guards for instance, in a culture wherein shortcuts are accepted common practice, then take the time to explain certain reasons behind certain steps of your SOP.
    • Synchronise; the How to, When to, What to do steps.
  • How much someone knows about an entire process or specific job affects the way they do perform. Incorporate safety, health and environment information into the task components; how-to-operate or how-to-do steps. What no to do, and what to be aware of, information is power.
  • How should the SOP be made available and distributed to intended users?
  • Who should teach others to use the procedure, and will we need dry runs, if any instruction?
  • How should the procedures contemplated be tested, and by whom will we get it tested?
  • Who will update the SOP, and what are our timeframes here?
  • Who will ensure compliance with the SOP is common practice?
  • Considering the work to be done and the commander’s guidance, what is a reasonable time line, to complete the SOP in?

RESPONSIBILITIES:

Be sure to assign responsibilities – Who is responsible for what?

We need a standard for operations – rosters, duty lists, deployment plans, contact numbers, and area of responsibility, mandates, and flow charts…etc. in the VOC or JOC, that must ties in with the SOP’s we use o the day.

A drawn Command and control structure – and their contact details – plus backup.

Instruction sets

Specific written instructions to security guards, marshals, wardens and staff, is a must have, providing written instructions at parade (assembly/briefing) to section commanders assures, that everything essential gets communicated on the day, or to the shift, with any special instructions to the staff on duty. This creates a platform for reference, questioning, and verification.

Checking all duty areas to ensure that they meet the standards we set of compliance.

Supervision and control, relies on measures and admin; deployment, rosters and manpower allocation – deployment plans.

Additional PROCEDURES:

Specific Instructions: at any time, new special instructions could be disseminated to personnel. It is your responsibility as the commander, to issue movement instructions.

We need to have marshals on the ground, whose soul task it is to move people in, around, and out of the venue…co-ordinated movement plans must also be in place.

  • Traffic management plans
  • Pedestrian
  • Goods\
  • Services
  • Emergency personnel – police, fire, ambulance, disaster mangment
  • Vip’s
  • other

During disasters, and even some emergency we need to control sectors. If say a joy ride chopper (helicopter) falls, then we need to restrict movement immediately to sector a, for instance. Same with our own people – say security – If everyone moves over to one point, what’s happening with all the other functions they need to perform, like guarding cash, or a gate etc? Specific movement orders need to be drawn up…

We need to have one co-ordinator per sector, to control sector level activities and movement, of personnel and equipment. This will be the VOC Venue Operations Centre Commander’s duty. Getting instructions from the JOC- Joint Operations Centre

With all this as back ground let’s summarise the look and feel of the real SOP.

COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN

CR1.0 CONTINGENCY READYNESS SOP

EMERGENCY STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

The Sop should have a procedure for every eventuality we could encounter and be printed in a pocket size document, like a small book…

Short to the point instructions;

For instance;

Fire

  • Determine the size of the involved area, both actual and potential.
  • Determine the apparent direction the fire is travelling and what lies in its path.
  • Consider the type of fire (business, residential, open land, etc.) and determine the need for evacuation.
  • if chemicals or hazardous substances are involved or potentially in danger of being involved.  Determine what the chemicals or substances are, their location, and how much. (GAS bottles, wood fires, materials, tyres, fuel, …)
  • Remain DOWNHILL and UPWIND from fires.
  • Constantly be aware of the potential for toxic smoke or fumes.
  • Immediately establish contact with JOC Incident Commander.
  • Maintain ingress and egress routes for emergency vehicles.
  • Establish a perimeter control, keeping unauthorized vehicles and pedestrians out of the involved areas.
  • If evacuation is imminent, consider the nearest exit

Critical Incidents – Police Call outs

.

  • Immediately determine the nature of the threat and the level, name it appropriately; A Armed robbery in progress, a shoot out in progress, burglary, a hold up, etc
  • Describe the  any weapons, injured, or suspect description, or vehicles involved
  • Notify JOC ASAP of the need for security or police.
  • Establish containment and maintain a perimeter, safe guard the crime scene, with all responders staying behind the barrier.
  • As help arrives, build out the perimeter – keep making it bigger – Cordon off the area at a safe distance, preventing entry by unauthorized persons.
  • If deemed necessary, arrange for the safe and timely evacuation of nearby residents and businesses.

Arrange to have medical and fire response standing by in a safe location if need be.

More related links;

Now – Read the book or Ebook; Read more in my new book Strategic Management, The Radical Revolutionary Strategic Management Matrix for Predators by Reinier Geel, now available at all these stores…

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11 Responses to “Looking at the nuts and bolts of a typical CONTINGENCY READYNESS SOP”

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